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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of Drainage theory for removal of excess water from irrigated lands found in the catalog.

Drainage theory for removal of excess water from irrigated lands

Drainage theory for removal of excess water from irrigated lands

  • 371 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Washington Water Research Center] in [Pullman, Wash .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Drainage,
  • Agricultural engineering

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDept. of Agricultural Engineering, Washington State University.
    ContributionsSoliman, Mostafa M., Jensen, M. C., Jensen, M. C., Lin, S. T., Thompson, G. T., State of Washington Water Research Center.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[49] p. in various paginations :
    Number of Pages49
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17065311M
    OCLC/WorldCa14082633

    In irrigated lands, the major objectives of drainage are to allow efficient leaching of excess salts from the root zone and to prevent the upward movement of saline groundwater. Several additional objectives may also be considered, e.g., the disposal of excess irrigation water due to poor irrigation efficiency, of irrigation return flow from Cited by: 2. Drainage Engineering. Daniel William Murphy. McGraw-Hill, - Drainage - pages. 0 Reviews. Preview this book.

      Fully renewed and extended, this edition is a valuable source of information for anyone involved in drainage engineering and management. It provides new theories, technologies, knowledge and experiences in combination with traditional land development practices in the humid temperature zone. Aspects covered include: management and . Drain for Gain: Making Water Management Worth its Salt: Subsurface Drainage Practices in Irrigated Agriculture in Semi-arid and Arid Regions - CRC Press Book Salinity affects 10 to 16% of all irrigated lands while the annual rate of land loss due to waterlogging and salinity is about million hectares per year.

    The water intake structures of such systems draw water from irrigation sources—rivers, large canals, lakes, reservoirs, and subterranean waters collected by means of wells or karezes (underground irrigation canals)—into irrigation canals, which transport it to the irrigated areas and distribute it among the irrigated plots. Sewage and water. Drainage of Irrigated Regions Irrigation Water Quality vis-à-vis Soil salinity. In irrigated areas, soil salinization is mostly a post-irrigation development caused by seepage through unlined water conveyance network and adoption of faulty irrigation practices.


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Drainage theory for removal of excess water from irrigated lands Download PDF EPUB FB2

DRAINAGE OF IRRIGATED LANDS is the ninth in a series of training manuals on irrigation. It discusses the need for drainage in irrigated areas, focussing on drainage at the farm level. CVE Water Resources Engineering 5/19 8.

DRAINAGE OF IRRIGATED LANDS Sources of Excess Water The main source of excess water: the seepage losses from reservoirs or canals, operational wastes in irrigation systems, surface runoff losses deep percolation losses etc. Drainage is a necessary operation irrespective of how the irrigation water is perfectly applied in the filed since excess File Size: KB.

A book of this nature covers a subject that ranges from the physical principles of the movement of water through soil to the mechanics of installing drainage systems. The art and practice of drainage involves integration of a multitude of ideas and techniques garnered from soil science, plant science, and engineering.

Irrigation and drainage, artificial application of water to land and artificial removal of excess water from land, respectively. Some land requires irrigation or drainage before it is possible to use it for any agricultural production; other land profits from either practice to increase production.

Some land, of course, does not need either. Although either practice may be, and both often are. The reasons for providing drainage are to remove excess soil water, to prevent soil salinization, and to ensure the trafficability and workability of the soil.

Theory of drainage Drainage theory is a tool that can be transferred from one place to another. The theory currently available appears to be adequate to tackle most practi-File Size: 3MB. To address excess water problems, the best fields in the U.S. corn belt have had drainage systems installed, which made those soils even more productive than they were naturally.

Drainage of wet fields allows for a longer growing season because farmers can get onto those fields earlier in the spring and harvest later in the fall without causing.

Irrigation is the application of controlled amounts of water to plants at needed intervals. Irrigation helps to grow agricultural crops, maintain landscapes, and revegetate disturbed soils in dry areas and during periods of less than average rainfall.

Irrigation also has other uses in crop production, including frost protection, suppressing weed growth in grain fields and preventing soil. The conventional drainage techniques used to drain excess water include vertical subsurface, horizontal subsurface, and surface drainage.

Nijland, Croon, and Ritzema () argue that surface drainage involves getting rid of excess of water on the soil to avoid unnecessary flooding. The technique entails digging of the open drains and trenches. Drainage of irrigated lands 7.

Washing of salined lands 8. Water loss reduction in irrigation system 9. Biological drainage Glossary Bibliography Summary Theoretical and practical questions concerning drainage of irrigated land are considered. The main causes of inundation and secondary salinization are discussed, andFile Size: KB.

Thirteenth International Water Technology Conference, IWTC 13Hurghada, Egypt irrigated lands. Sometimes, improved drainage can be an additional source of salts, as, for instance, when the lowered watertable induces saline seepage from outside area or when the drainage flow brings back into solution salts from the deeper soil layers.

Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of a surface's water and sub-surface water from an area with excess of water. The internal drainage of most agricultural soils is good enough to prevent severe waterlogging (anaerobic conditions that harm root growth), but many soils need artificial drainage to improve production or to manage water supplies.

book because we are primarily interested in the drainage of agricultural land, and we have narrowed our attention to consider, in the main, the removal of excess subsurface water by means of conduits or other water­ conveying devices.

United States Irrigation & Drainage Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Program Aid heavy water user, irrigated agriculture is but one of many needs for water, energy, and land resources.

At the same Use of crop irrigation on some lands is threatened by its effects on soils, groundwater, and surface water. Crops. Figure 1 classifies the various types of drainage systems. It shows the field (or internal) and the main (or external) systems.

The function of the field drainage system is to control the water table, whereas the function of the main drainage system is to collect, transport, and dispose of the water through an outfall or outlet.

In some instances one makes an additional distinction between. Agronomy Irrigation & Drainage, TIllage 22 1. A characteristic of loess or windblown soil parent material is its a. Sand and gravel layers at periodic intervals.

Relative uniformity and usually silty texture. High organic matter content. Distinct changes in soil texture from one part of the field to another.

An important component of field drainage is the ditch system that receives the excess water and carries it away from the field. Flow restrictions in these ditches can cause excess water to remain on a field. Drainage ditches should be maintained and routinely cleaned out to effectively handle the drainage water from a field.

No tillage or reducingFile Size: KB. Drainage manual: A guide to integrating plant, soil, and water relationships for drainage of irrigated lands [United States. Bureau of Reclamation.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Drainage manual: A guide to integrating plant, soil, and water relationships for drainage of irrigated landsAuthor.

United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Subsurface drainage is the removal of excess water and dissolved salts from soils via groundwater flow to the drains, so t hat the watertable and roo t zone salinity are : Henk Ritzema.

to increase the efficiency of drainage. The removal of shrubs and stones from the surface, soil liming, and fertilization are also performed during the construction of drainage systems.

Introduction Land drainage—the removal of excess water via File Size: KB. Drainage is the removal and disposal of excess water. Two separate principles are involved in drainage work.

These are surface and subsurface drainage. Surface drainage will be covered in this module. The module is applicable to field office operations. The applicable practice. Much of the alluvial lands cannot be made productive without prior development of water resources through flood control, drainage, and irrigation.

The production of electricity through hydropower and the production of alcohol fuel from irrigated crops, as has been practiced for many years in Brazil, can slow the increase in carbon emissions.of non-irrigated arid lands, ILRI conducted the study and followed an original.

approach. The principles of land drainage to remove excess water were applied to dry lands where there is a shortage of water, but where excess water occurs seasonally, because of .Drainage of irrigated lands 3 Chapter 2 Drainage and crop production THE NEED FOR DRAINAGE Figure 2 shows the water balance in an irrigated area.

Before irrigation water can be applied to a crop, it has to be diverted from a river or lake File Size: 4MB.